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HELP!!! My boys have taken over my YouTube Channel

I started DadsforCreativity to combine my interest in creativity with my desire to be the best possible Dad. At its height I had an audience. Folks would email me about my articles. I saw monthly increases in traffic. I included the website in my introductions, and then BANG. A graduate program, a documentary, and a third child came together in a massive storm that wreaked havoc on my schedule. Since then, my contributions to this blog have been disappointing. What’s even more depressing is a worry that the decrease in output is a reflection upon my interactions with my boys – are they becoming less? The answer is no (I hope). I say this, because during the past 15-months they have pushed me, forced me, nagged me, and tricked me into the production of a variety of YouTube videos that have now taken over my YouTube Channel. Therefore, today’s blog signals a series of future articles in support of our emerging studio.

See also: What is YouTube was an encyclopedia? 

YouTube

YouTube serves as an example of the affordances offered through the World Wide Web. It is a platform where you can access information about anything and everything, while also having the capacity to easily produce and share information as well. I used YouTube to explore changes to how we interactive with information in the documentary, Class of 2032: Schooling for a Digital Culture.

There are genuine concerns we need to address when working on any open platform, and I do not mean to undermine these concerns by promoting an article that focuses only on the creating and making aspect of our digital culture. However, learning to produce content using digital technology is important, and producing videos can challenge our little once to synthesis information and articulate what they’ve learned to others.

What follows is a few anecdotes on how I’m working to organize and manage the production of all these videos, while also working to explore other opportunities for learning during their creation. As you watch the videos, you’ll see my how my boys have begun to take greater ownership of the content, with personalized openings, closing, and an increased sense of how best to articulate their story to the audience.

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Plant Videos

This is really where it all started. My eldest developed an interest in plants and gardening, and YouTube was a major source of information. YouTube videos have led to the creation of a terrarium and the purchase of a variety of different succulents that are taking over our house. Naturally, he wanted to express his learning of plants via YouTube, and because the DadsforCreativity YouTube channel already featured his work, he figured he had a claim to take over the channel.

During the summer we produced a collection of random plant videos, and later began exploring how these videos might also introduce some history and cultural topics as shown in the War of the Roses video above.

 

Travel Videos

Travel videos offer an opportunity to integrate some formal learning experiences into your family vacation. Whether it’s a visit to the museum, the beach, or a new city, have your little one/s offer a summary of the experience in a short video using your phone. Keep it short and simple. Where are we? What did we see? What did you discover? On a side note, remember to hold the phone horizontally.

I would suggest you conduct a run through with these questions before pushing play. Remember to offer clarity. It’s ok to correct errors. For example, in the video above my boys became fascinated with the death of Lord Nelson. They remember the main points about the battle, but couldn’t remember his name, so I had to remind them before hitting record.

As your skills improve you will develop your own structure, for example, I know I was going to have the boys produce a video, so I shot the introduction video before entering the boat, I then recorded them explaining different things while on the ship, and then we did a summary at the end. Using a simple editing app (like iMovie) I then sequence the best clips together, added the music and text, and then pushed to YouTube.

Our travel videos are probably the most random; they include videos about crossing the road safely, as well as travel tips for riding the London Underground.

Discovery Videos

Other videos we’ve produced include safety and travel tips, as well as a collection of discovery videos that explore random topics such as Maple Farming.

Check out our full-compliment of videos on our YouTube channel. I’ve promised them we’ll make more. I just need to get through this semester first!

 

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kid Moviemaking contests: The Conjurer (plus Kid Movie Making Tips)

We’ve decided to launch a parent and kid competition. The Conjurer is a fun video challenge that requires parents and their kids to produce a short 15-second video using a mobile device. Winners will receive a Dads for Creativity T Shirt, and an absolutely awesome mini Tripod, which was kindly donated by Joby (Thank you Joby!)

BACKGROUND:

The Conjurer is a black and white, 1899 movie made by illusionist and filmmaker Georges Melies. Accompanied by a ballet dancer, George Melies performs a quick series of magic acts, including disappearances, reappearances, and transformations.

Now with a mobile device and moviemaking app we can accomplish the same effects used in this film by making two minor edits in our timeline. The creativity is in the story that you create and the items that you make disappear!

THE HOW TO ARTICLE: Kid Movie Making Tips: 6 Easy Steps to Movie Making Magic

COMPETITION RULES

Films must be filmed and edited with a mobile device ONLY.

  • The film must replicate the general gist of The Conjurer, which means you must make something disappear, or appear, or transform.
  • Films must be under 45-seconds and will be judged for their creativity and story.
  • If it’s available you’re encouraged to add a filter that creates the look of an old film, but it’s not required.

Submission links must be posted below or shared on the Dads for Creativity Facebook page. We also welcome submissions via Instagram (which has a 15 second cap), but you must remember to use our handle @dadsforcreativity and include the hashtag #TheConjurer.

SEE ALSO: Moviemaking with Children: Making things disappear on video

Suggested Resources

  • Movie Making App (iMovie is certainly my preference)
  • Mini Tripod is helpful

 

COMMENT BELOW for FREE FILM on Creativity in Education

You can also view the entire film for free by simply commenting on one of our articles. Anyone who shares or contributes content via the comments below* will receive a FREE download to Creativity in Education: Exploring the Imbalance.

If you choose to comment via social media be sure to sure to include reference to @dads4creativityor share from our Facebook page. We’ll follow up with details via a private message.

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FeaturedImage_DaveDiBartolo

Kid Movie Making Ideas: 3 Question Interview with Daddy STOP MOTION Animator, Dave DiBartolo

DFC

When it comes to Kid Moviemaking Ideas, Lego Stop Motion is super, super high on the list. Not only does it allow our little ones to generate fun stories that can be easily captured, but it also extends the creative thinking to constructing worlds, and engaging problem-solving skills in not only the child, but parent as well.

After fellow parent, David DiBartolo completed his Fine Arts degree he landed in the world of video, and now applies these skills at home with his son Drew. Below he shares some tips and tricks for parents looking to get into Lego moviemaking. Also, don’t forget to comment for free access to the film Creativity in Education: Exploring the Imbalance.

See Also: 3 Question Interview with Professional Stop Motion Animator Alex Kobbs

How did you get into making Lego videos with your little one?

When my son Drew was four he got his first Lego set, a Star Wars spaceship of some kind. I noticed he had some really imaginative play with just the ship and the three characters that came along. I thought it would be a great idea to film him and capture some of the great stories he was telling. As his/our passion for Lego grew we began watching some really great stop-motion Lego movies on YouTube, and it was Drew who suggested we try to make our own.

Like any creative endeavor, it began very basic. I wanted to find a way to make it easy for a four/five year old to make his own movies as well as keep his attention so he doesn’t get board of the monotony of the stop-motion process.

We had no lights or tripod. I chose the brightest room in our house and suggested we shoot on my iPhone as appose to the DSLR cameras that many of the YouTube videos are shot with. As for a stop-motion app, we landed on the “LEGO Movie” app. It has some canned effects, stock music, and a pretty simple UI for a four/five year old to grasp.

Kid Moviemaking Ideas: Dave and Drew setting up a shot in one of their movies.
Kid Moviemaking Ideas: Dave and Drew setting up a shot in one of their movies.

Can you tell us a little about the Lego Stop Motion App? How easy is it to use? Do you need to know about Stop Motion and Movie Making?

The “LEGO Movie” app is pretty simple. It gives you the option to chose your focal point, turn on the flash on your phone, and use it as a light. An “onion layer” option so you can see the previous shot for a fluid sequence. As well as some pre-canned effects and music to help make the post-production of the video a little easier.

What advice can you offer parents looking to make Lego videos with their kids?

Start simple and plan out the story before going into the shoot. Drew and I have a “pre-production” meeting where I try to limit his grand ideas into a simple story. He has a great imagination and sometimes imagines stories that would rival most summer blockbuster films.

The best thing I learned is to give him rules to work within, otherwise he’d either get frustrated, or bored, and not want to finish – or we’d end up working all night!

I have him choose a hero, a villain and some supporting cast. I also have him choose one location and work the story around that location. I ask him what problem his hero has to solve. If the solution begins to get a bit too violent I ask him what his hero could do to avoid the violence. Asking questions about his story really helps hone in on the core of the story he is trying to tell. I let him create the story I just guide him in a positive direction.

Sometimes he gets really excited about his idea and I suggest we draw storyboards so when we go into filming I can refer to this so he stays on task.

As for useful equipment, using a tripod and/or a studio light help. The main reason is to get a level steady shot and try to even out the light, so the shadows don’t get too heavy.

Check out one of Drew and David’s films below.


COMMENT BELOW for FREE FILM on Creativity in Education

You can also view the entire film for free by simply commenting on one of our articles. Anyone who shares or contributes content via the comments below* will receive a FREE download to Creativity in Education: Exploring the Imbalance.

If you choose to comment via social media be sure to sure to include reference to #dadsforcreativity or share from our Facebook page. We’ll follow up with details via a private message.

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Kid Movie Making Ideas (DadsforCreativity)

Kid Movie Making Ideas: Parent and Kid Video Competition (The Conjurer)

Building upon our kid movie making ideas, we’ve decided to launch a parent and kid competition. The Conjurer is a fun video challenge that requires parents and their kids to produce a short 15-45 second video using a mobile device. Winners will receive a Dads for Creativity T Shirt, and an absolutely awesome GorillaPod tripod, which was kindly donated by Joby (Thank you Joby!)

BACKGROUND:

The Conjurer is a black and white, 1899 movie made by illusionist and filmmaker Georges Melies. Accompanied by a ballet dancer, George Melies performs a quick series of magic acts, including disappearances, reappearances, and transformations.

Now with a mobile device and moviemaking app we can accomplish the same effects used in this film by making two minor edits in our timeline. The creativity is in the story that you create and the items that you make disappear!

STEP-BY-STEP GUIDE: Kid Movie Making Ideas: 6 Easy Steps to Making Movie Magic

COMPETITION RULES:

Films must be filmed and edited with a mobile device ONLY.

  • The film must replicate the general gist of The Conjurer, which means you must make something disappear, or appear, or transform.
  • Films must be under 45-seconds and will be judged for their creativity and story.
  • If it’s available you’re encouraged to add a filter that creates the look of an old film, but it’s not required.

Suggested Resources:

  • Movie Making App (iMovie is certainly my preference)
  • Mini Tripod is helpful

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:

Submission links must be posted below or shared on the Dads for Creativity Facebook page. We also welcome submissions via Instagram (which has a 15 second cap), but you must remember to use our handle @dadsforcreativity and include the hashtag #TheConjurer. Provide any questions in the comments below.


COMMENT BELOW for FREE FILM on Creativity in Education

You can also view the entire film for free by simply commenting on one of our articles. Anyone who shares or contributes content via the comments below* will receive a FREE download to Creativity in Education: Exploring the Imbalance.

If you choose to comment via social media be sure to sure to include reference to #dadsforcreativity or share from our Facebook page. We’ll follow up with details via a private message.

Read More