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3 Question Interview with Dr. Devers: Effective feedback during the pandemic

This article continues a series on how to deliver effective feedback during a pandemic.

A few years back, I was able to produce weekly posts on Dadsforcreativity; sadly, I haven’t been able to reestablish that routine – life was certainly different with only one little one to contend with each week. That said, I’m committed to reintroducing the DadsforCreativity: Three question interview. This series is when I reach out to experts in a particular space and ask them questions about cultivating creativity at home – or other items relevant to education.

See Also: Supporting effective feedback from a distance

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Dr. Devers is interested in applied metacognitive processes and how people learn.

Last month I wrote an article supporting our children’s schooling during the pandemic and introduced a topic related to delivering effective feedback from a distance (or better stated – delivering effective feedback during a pandemic). To further explore this topic, I reached out to Christopher Devers (@chrisdevers) at Johns Hopkins University. Professor Devers received his Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and has an MS in educational administration from Purdue University. Dr. Devers is interested in applied metacognitive processes and how people learn. Specifically, he explores learning using videos, mobile devices, and online environments.

 

What are the main methods of feedback we typically expect as part of a formal learning experience?

Generally, I would argue that there are two main ways that students receive feedback — first tests and assignments, and second from teachers — both are valuable but serve different purposes. Tests help students discern what they know or do not know, as well as facilitate retrieval practice (see Roediger, Putnam, & Smith, 2011). Feedback from teachers can help students know where they are, where they are going, and where to go next (see Hattie & Clarke, 2018).

What challenges do you anticipate this year as teachers work to accommodate homeschooling once again?

Given all the unique educational situations, we should relax and be flexible! There are a few things that might be helpful to remember when teaching in digital environments. First, even though we are moving online, much of what works in face-to-face situations will likely work well in digital environments, given some creativity. For example, self-explanation (see Chi, Lewis, Reimann, & Glaser, 1989) works well in face-to-face environments and can be used in digital environments with programs like Flipgrid. Second, be mindful of everyone’s limitations — administrators, teachers, students, and caregivers — be cautious of simply trying to check things off the list just to get them done. Third, keep it simple and do not overcomplicate things; use what works. Last, have fun and be creative!

What advice do you have for parents as they try to support their child’s learning from home?

Be patient. Administrators, teachers, and staff are working very hard to support students in this unique situation. As with any learning experience, face-to-face or online, focus on using strong evidence-based practices (see Dunlosky et al., 2013). Additionally, when evaluating educational apps, be sure that they follow the principle of multimedia learning (see the Mayer, 2014 chapter). Twitter can also provide fantastic educational resources; I suggest following me (@chrisdevers), Dan Willigham (@DTWillingham), Paul Kirschner (@P_A_Kirschner), Robert Slavin (@RobertSlavin), Regan Gurung (@ReganARGurung), Retrieval Practice (@RetrieveLearn), and Learning Scientist (@AceThatTest). Curt Bonk’s (@travelinedmanwebsite includes some creative resources about online education.

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Matthew Worwood
Matthew Worwood is Associate Director of Digital Media & Design at the University of Connecticut, as well as a Doctoral Student at Johns Hopkins University. He works within the learning sciences, with a particular focus on instructional design and the use of digital media for learning.

Matthew Worwood

Matthew Worwood is Associate Director of Digital Media & Design at the University of Connecticut, as well as a Doctoral Student at Johns Hopkins University. He works within the learning sciences, with a particular focus on instructional design and the use of digital media for learning.

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